The Relationship Between the Use of Adult Dementia Day Care and Caregiver Quality of Life Purpose To qualify the use of adult dementia day care services as an appropriate respite opportunity to improve the quality of life of the caregiver. Design and Methods Thirty familial caregivers from the Alzheimer's Association were recruited and divided into three groups based on number of days of ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 2015
The Relationship Between the Use of Adult Dementia Day Care and Caregiver Quality of Life
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cathleen Carney Thomas
    Department of Communication Disorders, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN
  • Lisa Wallace
    Department of Health Sciences, A. T. Still University, Mesa, AZ
  • Jeff Alexander
    Department of Health Sciences, A. T. Still University, Mesa, AZ
  • Aparna Vijayan
    Eisenhower Army Medical Hospital, Fort Gordon, GA
  • Disclosures: Financial: Cathleen Carney Thomas, Lisa Wallace, Jeff Alexander, and Aparna Vijayan have no financial interests to disclose.
    Disclosures: Financial: Cathleen Carney Thomas, Lisa Wallace, Jeff Alexander, and Aparna Vijayan have no financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Cathleen Carney Thomas, Lisa Wallace, Jeff Alexander, and Aparna Vijayan have no nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Cathleen Carney Thomas, Lisa Wallace, Jeff Alexander, and Aparna Vijayan have no nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Articles
Article   |   September 01, 2015
The Relationship Between the Use of Adult Dementia Day Care and Caregiver Quality of Life
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, September 2015, Vol. 20, 104-115. doi:10.1044/gero20.3.104
History: Received June 26, 2015 , Revised August 6, 2015 , Accepted August 13, 2015
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, September 2015, Vol. 20, 104-115. doi:10.1044/gero20.3.104
History: Received June 26, 2015; Revised August 6, 2015; Accepted August 13, 2015

Purpose To qualify the use of adult dementia day care services as an appropriate respite opportunity to improve the quality of life of the caregiver.

Design and Methods Thirty familial caregivers from the Alzheimer's Association were recruited and divided into three groups based on number of days of use of day care services (non-use, 1–2 day use, and 3–5 day use). Survey data was self-report and measured using scores from the Evaluations Scale of Caregiver's Quality of Life. Quantitative results from the 20-item questionnaire were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney U tests.

Results The analysis showed statistically significant difference in the perception of burden for the group using day care 1–2 days per week than those that did not use the service at all. These findings were not seen in the group using the services 3–5 days per week.

Implications Results lead toward the use of an adult day care program attended 3–5 days a week, incorporation of a support group with day care services, and the implementation of a structured home program for all participants to reduce caregiver level of burden.

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