The Impact of Subjective and Objective Hearing Loss on Cognition and Memory in Older Adults For this exploratory cross-disciplinary study, a speech-language pathologist and an audiologist collaborated to investigate the effects of objective and subjective hearing loss on cognition and memory in 11 older adults without hearing loss (OAs), 6 older adults with unaided hearing loss (HLOAs), and 16 young adults (YAs). All participants received ... Article
Article  |   May 01, 2015
The Impact of Subjective and Objective Hearing Loss on Cognition and Memory in Older Adults
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yvonne Rogalski
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, Ithaca College, Ithaca, NY
  • Amy Rominger
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, Ithaca College, Ithaca, NY
  • Disclosures: Financial: Yvonne Rogalski and Amy Rominger have no financial interests to disclose.
    Disclosures: Financial: Yvonne Rogalski and Amy Rominger have no financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: The data from this manuscript has been presented in poster format at the May 2014 Clinical Aphasiology Conference in St. Simons Island, GA and at the November 2014 ASHA convention in Orlando, FL.
    Nonfinancial: The data from this manuscript has been presented in poster format at the May 2014 Clinical Aphasiology Conference in St. Simons Island, GA and at the November 2014 ASHA convention in Orlando, FL.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   May 01, 2015
The Impact of Subjective and Objective Hearing Loss on Cognition and Memory in Older Adults
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, May 2015, Vol. 20, 49-57. doi:10.1044/gero20.2.49
History: Received February 27, 2015 , Accepted March 14, 2015
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, May 2015, Vol. 20, 49-57. doi:10.1044/gero20.2.49
History: Received February 27, 2015; Accepted March 14, 2015

For this exploratory cross-disciplinary study, a speech-language pathologist and an audiologist collaborated to investigate the effects of objective and subjective hearing loss on cognition and memory in 11 older adults without hearing loss (OAs), 6 older adults with unaided hearing loss (HLOAs), and 16 young adults (YAs). All participants received cognitive testing and a complete audiologic evaluation including a subjective questionnaire about perceived hearing difficulty. Memory testing involved listening to or reading aloud a text passage then verbally recalling the information. Key findings revealed that objective hearing loss and subjective hearing loss were correlated and both were associated with a cognitive screening test. Potential clinical implications are discussed and include a need for more cross-professional collaboration in assessing older adults with hearing loss.

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