From the Coordinator At this year's in-person planning meeting, the SIG 15 Coordinating Committee spent time reflecting on the theme of advocacy. Advocacy, part of the scope of practice and professional responsibilities for speech-language pathologists and audiologists, is defined by Merriam-Webster as “the act or process of supporting a cause or proposal.” ... Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column  |   May 01, 2014
From the Coordinator
Author Notes
Article Information
Older Adults & Aging / Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column   |   May 01, 2014
From the Coordinator
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, May 2014, Vol. 19, 49. doi:10.1044/gero19.2.49
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, May 2014, Vol. 19, 49. doi:10.1044/gero19.2.49
At this year's in-person planning meeting, the SIG 15 Coordinating Committee spent time reflecting on the theme of advocacy. Advocacy, part of the scope of practice and professional responsibilities for speech-language pathologists and audiologists, is defined by Merriam-Webster as “the act or process of supporting a cause or proposal.” There are various forms of advocacy related to our professions. We advocate for public policy that benefits our profession and the individuals and families we serve. Our Coordinating Committee visited Capitol Hill and advocated for repeal of the Medicare B therapy caps, passage of a tax credit for hearing aids, and promotion of telehealth standards that support current licensure and certification regulations. We advocate for our patients and their families as they navigate the healthcare labyrinth ironically referred to as the continuum of care. At times, we are called to advocate for ourselves…this might be the most challenging form of advocacy for many of us. When we are faced with workplace policies that challenge our personal and professional boundaries regarding productivity, the methods by which we determine candidacy for treatment, as well as the amount and type of services we provide, our ethical and professional code requires us to advocate. While we do enjoy the benefit of membership in a professional association that provides vast resources, including the ability to influence policy, ASHA ultimately cannot solve these workplace challenges for us. As licensed and certified professionals, we must advocate for ourselves. We must, in a professional and effective manner, challenge the incorrect and sometimes misperceived assumptions and messages that often underlie these difficult situations. This isn't easy, but it is essential to the well-being of our profession and our individual selves. This spring, I challenge each of you to reflect on your skills as an advocate. I challenge you to step outside your comfort zone and advocate in a way that you haven't before…call your congressman about a legislative issue, speak to the physician about your patient's end-of-life wishes, talk to your manager about your productivity expectations. As professionals, we must find and use our voices.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.