Accommodating Dual Sensory Loss in Everyday Practice Dual sensory impairment is increasingly prevalent in people over age 65. The combination of vision loss and hearing loss impacts not only day-to-day function from the perspective of the patient, but must also be considered by the speech-language pathologist working with older people in health care settings. This article will ... Article
Article  |   January 01, 2014
Accommodating Dual Sensory Loss in Everyday Practice
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Katharina V. Echt
    Center for Visual and Neurocognitive Rehabilitation, Birmingham-Atlanta Veterans Affairs Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Decatur, GA
    Department of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, and Geriatrics, Emory University, Atlanta, GA
  • Gabrielle H. Saunders
    National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Portland VA Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon
  • Disclosure: Financial: Katarina V. Echt works in the Birmingham-Atlanta GRECC and at Emory University. Gabrielle H. Saunders works for the Portland VA Medical Center and Oregon Health and Science University.
    Disclosure: Financial: Katarina V. Echt works in the Birmingham-Atlanta GRECC and at Emory University. Gabrielle H. Saunders works for the Portland VA Medical Center and Oregon Health and Science University.×
  • Nonfinancial: Katharina V. Echt and Gabrielle H. Saunders have previously published in this subject area. Some of their works are referenced in the piece.
    Nonfinancial: Katharina V. Echt and Gabrielle H. Saunders have previously published in this subject area. Some of their works are referenced in the piece.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Articles
Article   |   January 01, 2014
Accommodating Dual Sensory Loss in Everyday Practice
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, January 2014, Vol. 19, 4-16. doi:10.1044/gero19.1.04
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, January 2014, Vol. 19, 4-16. doi:10.1044/gero19.1.04

Dual sensory impairment is increasingly prevalent in people over age 65. The combination of vision loss and hearing loss impacts not only day-to-day function from the perspective of the patient, but must also be considered by the speech-language pathologist working with older people in health care settings. This article will discuss the implications of dual sensory impairment for both patients and professionals, and will provide strategies to support communication.

Acknowledgements
We gratefully acknowledge the contributions of Carrie Bruce, M.A., SLP/CCC in the development of this manuscript. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration, Office of Research and Development, Rehabilitation Research and Development Service. The contents do not represent the views of the Department of Veterans Affairs or the United States Government.
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