Article  |   September 2012
Therapy Session 2.0: From Static to Dynamic With the iPad
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Andrea Hirsch Atticks
    Loyola University Maryland, Loyola Clinical Centers, Baltimore, MD
  • Disclosure: Andrea Hirsch Atticks has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Andrea Hirsch Atticks has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
  • © 2012 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Older Adults & Aging / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches
Article   |   September 2012
Therapy Session 2.0: From Static to Dynamic With the iPad
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, September 2012, Vol. 17, 84-93. doi:10.1044/gero17.3.84
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, September 2012, Vol. 17, 84-93. doi:10.1044/gero17.3.84

Tablets, specifically the iPad, quickly are becoming a valuable therapy tool for clients with cognitive-communication deficits. Speech-language pathologists are beginning to introduce the iPad into therapy in innovative ways that capture their clients' attention, motivate them, and empower them to be successful outside of the therapy session. The popularity and proliferation of mobile technology is threefold: incoming clinicians, who have been born into a digital world, are readily using technology and mobile devices with their clients; mobile devices and apps are replacing the larger isolating Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) predecessors; and many clients are requesting the use of technology in their therapy sessions. These mobile devices are readily available, relatively inexpensive compared to AAC devices of the past, and do not isolate individuals with cognitive-communication deficits from the general population. These devices, rather, are the “it factor” that spans generations (The Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Communication Enhancement, 2011). Although these multifunctional devices are innovative and accessible, they do not replace a speech-language pathologist. Evidence-based practice and appropriate objectives are essential. Experienced clinicians must serve as advocates for our clients and provide ongoing support and assistance. Therapy does not end in the session by simply handing the client an iPad. Clinicians serve a critical role in identifying the appropriate software applications (apps) for their clients, using evidence-based practice, and providing continued support and training for clients to be successful and to meet their personal goals.

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