Communication Strategy Training for Caregivers of Individuals With Dementia Researchers in this study investigated the perceptions of 14 professional and family caregivers regarding 11 communication strategies to use during interactions with individuals with dementia. The results showed that 10 of the strategies were frequently reported in the literature for caregivers of individuals with dementia (Small, Gutman, Saskia, & Hillhouse, ... Article
Article  |   September 01, 2012
Communication Strategy Training for Caregivers of Individuals With Dementia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary Beth Mason-Baughman
    Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Clarion, PA
  • Andrew Lander
    Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Clarion, PA
  • Disclosure: Mary Beth Mason-Baughman is a Clarion University Community Fellows grant recipient
    Disclosure: Mary Beth Mason-Baughman is a Clarion University Community Fellows grant recipient×
  • Disclosure: Andrew Lander has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Andrew Lander has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Articles
Article   |   September 01, 2012
Communication Strategy Training for Caregivers of Individuals With Dementia
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, September 2012, Vol. 17, 78-83. doi:10.1044/gero17.3.78
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, September 2012, Vol. 17, 78-83. doi:10.1044/gero17.3.78

Researchers in this study investigated the perceptions of 14 professional and family caregivers regarding 11 communication strategies to use during interactions with individuals with dementia. The results showed that 10 of the strategies were frequently reported in the literature for caregivers of individuals with dementia (Small, Gutman, Saskia, & Hillhouse, 2003). The investigators added a final strategy that focused on using pictures, books, and props during interactions and planning/structuring interactions. Caregivers completed questionnaires before and after training to rate the importance and frequency of use of each strategy. Caregivers then participated in a training session led by the investigators that included a verbal and written explanation of each strategy and a description of why using the strategy would help to improve communication interactions. Comparisons of pretraining to posttraining questionnaires showed that most caregivers did not use materials such as books, pictures, magazines, and games during communication interactions and did not try to plan for visits/interactions pretraining; posttraining, however, most caregivers responded that they would frequently use materials and plan for interactions.

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