Article  |   May 2012
The Logopenic Variant of Primary Progressive Aphasia: Effects on Linguistic Communication
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nidhi Mahendra
    Aging and Cognition Research Clinic, Department of Communicative Sciences & Disorders, California State University East Bay, Hayward, California
  • Nidhi Mahendra is a certified bilingual speech-language pathologist and associate professor in the department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders at California State University East Bay (CSUEB). She directs the Aging and Cognition Research Clinic and is involved with the Aphasia Treatment Program at CSUEB. Her expertise is in the assessment and management of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias as well as multicultural issues in speech language pathology.
    Nidhi Mahendra is a certified bilingual speech-language pathologist and associate professor in the department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders at California State University East Bay (CSUEB). She directs the Aging and Cognition Research Clinic and is involved with the Aphasia Treatment Program at CSUEB. Her expertise is in the assessment and management of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias as well as multicultural issues in speech language pathology.×
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Speech, Voice & Prosody
Article   |   May 2012
The Logopenic Variant of Primary Progressive Aphasia: Effects on Linguistic Communication
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology May 2012, Vol.17, 50-59. doi:10.1044/gero17.2.50
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology May 2012, Vol.17, 50-59. doi:10.1044/gero17.2.50

Recently, researchers have detailed the logopenic variant of primary progressive aphasia (LV-PPA) as the third subtype of primary progressive aphasia. In this article, I will present a case study of an individual with the logopenic variant of primary progressive aphasia. I will describe the performance of an individual client on tests of cognitive and language function and present recommendations for intervention.

I will integrate data from neurological examination, neuroimaging investigation, speech-language pathology evaluations, and caregiver report to offer clinicians a better understanding of LV-PPA.

The logopenic variant of primary progressive aphasia has a profound effect on communicative and cognitive functions. Speech-language pathologists can add much to the clinical assessment and management of LV-PPA by carefully documenting cognitive-communicative functioning and implementing interventions that can optimize communicative interactions and maximize patient and caregiver coping skills.

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