Semantic Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease: Clinical Differences in Speech-Language Pathology Speech-language pathologists working in the field of geriatrics need to be aware of two variants of primary progressive aphasia (PPA). The nonfluent type is characterized by dissolution of phonology (spoken word form) and syntax (grammar), in the absence of any cognitive and semantic deficits at the time of onset ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2002
Semantic Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease: Clinical Differences in Speech-Language Pathology
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Regina Jokel
    University of Toronto
  • Elizabeth Rochon
    University of Toronto
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2002
Semantic Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease: Clinical Differences in Speech-Language Pathology
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, December 2002, Vol. 7, 8-13. doi:10.1044/gero7.3.8
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, December 2002, Vol. 7, 8-13. doi:10.1044/gero7.3.8
Speech-language pathologists working in the field of geriatrics need to be aware of two variants of primary progressive aphasia (PPA). The nonfluent type is characterized by dissolution of phonology (spoken word form) and syntax (grammar), in the absence of any cognitive and semantic deficits at the time of onset (Mesulam, 1982; 2001; Thompson, Ballard, Tait, Mesulam, & Weintraub, 1992; Rogers & Alarcon, 1998, Kertesz & Orange, 2000). The nonfluent type has retained the original name of PPA. The other type, termed semantic dementia (SD), is a fluent variant with initially intact cognition and progressively diminishing receptive and expressive vocabulary due to semantic loss (Hodges, Patterson, Oxbury, & Funnell, 1992; Breedin, Saffran, & Coslett, 1994 s; Hodges & Patterson, 1996). Both SD and nonfluent PPA are associated with a larger group of disorders resulting from a dysfunction to the fronto-temporal lobes of the brain, termed accordingly the fronto-temporal dementias (FTD).
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