Augmentative and Alternative Communication in the Geriatric Population: A Review of Literature Speech-language pathologists working in the subacute rehabilitation setting often evaluate and treat patients with complex communication impairments. Many of these patients benefit from the use of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) to facilitate expression of basic wants and needs. When it comes to implementing an AAC system into a care ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2009
Augmentative and Alternative Communication in the Geriatric Population: A Review of Literature
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christopher Crema
    Genesis Rehabilitation Services, Andover, MA
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2009
Augmentative and Alternative Communication in the Geriatric Population: A Review of Literature
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, December 2009, Vol. 14, 42-46. doi:10.1044/gero14.2.42
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, December 2009, Vol. 14, 42-46. doi:10.1044/gero14.2.42
Abstract

Speech-language pathologists working in the subacute rehabilitation setting often evaluate and treat patients with complex communication impairments. Many of these patients benefit from the use of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) to facilitate expression of basic wants and needs. When it comes to implementing an AAC system into a care plan, there are a vast number of options available. A thorough evaluation is crucial when determining the most appropriate AAC system to use. These systems can range from gesturing, to a static overlay board, to a more complex, dynamic high tech device. Implementation of AAC systems has been proven to assist people with severe communication deficits that have been caused by a variety of medical conditions. Numerous studies have documented the efficacy of the use of AAC systems with individuals with traumatic brain injury, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, and developmental disabilities. However, little has been documented regarding the use of AAC in the dementia, aphasia, and geriatric populations. This article will review the literature regarding the use of AAC with these populations.

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