Effects of Environmental Props on Communication in Aphasia Group Therapy Group treatment is a viable intervention for adults with a variety of acquired neuropathologies. Using groups for intervention has been best established with persons with aphasia and allows for a focus on activity limitations and participation restrictions (World Health Organization [WHO], 2001). Wertz et al. (1981) showed that group therapy ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2009
Effects of Environmental Props on Communication in Aphasia Group Therapy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jane Pimentel
    Department of Communication Disorders, Eastern Washington University, Spokane, WA
  • Dana Algeo
    Spokane School District, Spokane, WA
Article Information
Older Adults & Aging / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2009
Effects of Environmental Props on Communication in Aphasia Group Therapy
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, July 2009, Vol. 14, 12-18. doi:10.1044/gero14.1.12
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, July 2009, Vol. 14, 12-18. doi:10.1044/gero14.1.12
Abstract

Group treatment is a viable intervention for adults with a variety of acquired neuropathologies. Using groups for intervention has been best established with persons with aphasia and allows for a focus on activity limitations and participation restrictions (World Health Organization [WHO], 2001). Wertz et al. (1981) showed that group therapy was at least as good as individual treatment and Elman and Bernstein-Ellis some years later demonstrated the efficacy of aphasia group therapy (1999a). This group therapy has been described as a communication halfway house, providing a safe place to produce less than perfect speech and practice compensatory strategies to communicate in a meaningful way (Helm-Estabrooks & Albert, 2004). Meaningful language goes beyond expressing wants and needs and addresses the social component to language (Light, 1988). The National Aphasia Association aptly describes this social focus of language saying that “the reach of aphasia seldom ends within the domain of language, as our ability to communicate shapes our perception of self and our ability to interact with friends and loved ones” (NAA, 2002). Elman and Bernstein-Ellis also demonstrated this psychosocial benefit of aphasia group therapy (1999b).

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