Accessible Internet Training for People With Aphasia and Parkinson's Disease This article describes the development of an Internet training project that used communicationfriendly Internet training materials for people with acquired cognitivelinguistic impairments. The training materials were based on Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.5 and consisted of a tutor’s manual and a manual for the Internet student with the communication disability. ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2004
Accessible Internet Training for People With Aphasia and Parkinson's Disease
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda Worrall
    Communication Disability in Ageing Research Centre, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Australia
  • Jennifer Egan
    Communication Disability in Ageing Research Centre, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Australia
  • Dorothea Oxenham
    Communication Disability in Ageing Research Centre, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Australia
  • Felicity Stewart
    Communication Disability in Ageing Research Centre, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Queensland, Australia
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2004
Accessible Internet Training for People With Aphasia and Parkinson's Disease
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, December 2004, Vol. 9, 10-13. doi:10.1044/gero9.2.10
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, December 2004, Vol. 9, 10-13. doi:10.1044/gero9.2.10
This article describes the development of an Internet training project that used communicationfriendly Internet training materials for people with acquired cognitivelinguistic impairments. The training materials were based on Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.5 and consisted of a tutor’s manual and a manual for the Internet student with the communication disability. These materials are available as a free download from www.shrs.uq. edu.au/cdaru/aphasiagroups/. Outcomes of the evaluation of the project, which included 20 people with aphasia, 7 people with Parkinson’s disease, and 7 people with traumatic brain injury, are reported in a series of publications (Egan, Worrall, & Oxenham, 2004; Egan, Worrall, & Oxenham, in press; Stewart, Worrall, Egan, & Oxenham, in press). However, outcomes of the evaluation with the older population groups (people with aphasia and people with Parkinson’s disease) are summarized here.
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