A Word from the Division Coordinator I am pleased to write my first column for the newsletter for the Gerontology Special Interest Division. I would like to welcome our many new affiliates and thank you for your many suggestions for expanding the activities of the division. This newsletter includes articles by clinicians and researchers on ... Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column  |   August 01, 1999
A Word from the Division Coordinator
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Older Adults & Aging / Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column   |   August 01, 1999
A Word from the Division Coordinator
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, August 1999, Vol. 4, 1-2. doi:10.1044/gero4.1.1
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, August 1999, Vol. 4, 1-2. doi:10.1044/gero4.1.1
I am pleased to write my first column for the newsletter for the Gerontology Special Interest Division. I would like to welcome our many new affiliates and thank you for your many suggestions for expanding the activities of the division. This newsletter includes articles by clinicians and researchers on topics which our affiliates requested. Rather than commenting on each of these, I would like to update you on some new research findings in the area of aging, some of which were reported in Aging Today (July/August 1999), an organ of the American Society on Aging.
A recent study conducted by the Seniors Research Group, commissioned by the National Council on Aging, and funded by the Hearing Industries Association revealed some interesting findings about untreated hearing loss in older adults. Respondents to the nationwide survey of 2,304 individuals with impaired hearing and 2,090 of their significant others revealed that older adults with untreated hearing loss, irrespective of hearing loss severity, were more likely to feel depressed, angry, and emotionally unstable than their counterparts who owned hearing aids. Hearing aid non-users were described as being more introverted and were more likely to feel as though they had little control over there lives. While only a survey, the findings were compelling in that they confirmed that hearing aids help to improve the quality of life of older adults in the emotional and social domains of function. A complete text of the results is available from the NCOA Web site (webmaster@ncoa.org).
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