A Primer for Speech-Language Pathologists Managing Clients With Huntington's Disease in a Residential Care Facility Huntington’s disease (HD) is a progressive, autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease (Huntington’s Disease Society of America [HDSA], n.d.). Each child of an affected parent has a 50%-chance of developing the disease. HD presents with motor, cognitive, and psychiatric impairments, which affect people at different rates and with different levels of ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2007
A Primer for Speech-Language Pathologists Managing Clients With Huntington's Disease in a Residential Care Facility
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jackie Cassiday
    Lowell Healthcare Center, Lowell, MA
  • Sue Imbriglio
    Lowell Healthcare Center, Lowell, MA
  • Lynn Cerillo
    JFK Johnson Rehabilitation Institute, Edison, NJ
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Older Adults & Aging / Healthcare Settings / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2007
A Primer for Speech-Language Pathologists Managing Clients With Huntington's Disease in a Residential Care Facility
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, October 2007, Vol. 12, 22-26. doi:10.1044/gero12.1.22
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, October 2007, Vol. 12, 22-26. doi:10.1044/gero12.1.22
Huntington’s disease (HD) is a progressive, autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease (Huntington’s Disease Society of America [HDSA], n.d.). Each child of an affected parent has a 50%-chance of developing the disease. HD presents with motor, cognitive, and psychiatric impairments, which affect people at different rates and with different levels of severity (HDSA). However, most people with HD exhibit components of all of these symptoms at some point during the disease’s progression (Kirkwood, Su, & Conneally, 2001). In adults, symptoms usually begin between the ages of 30 and 50, and last for 10 to 25 years (HDSA). Wheelock et al. (2000)  demonstrated that motor impairment was the most likely predictor of nursing home placement, but dysphagia and weight loss were also noted to precipitate institutionalization for some people with HD.
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