Experience With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Incidence, Pathology, and Treatment Considerations Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive, degenerative neurological disease affecting motor neurons throughout the nervous system and, therefore, referred to as a motor neuron disease (MND). Examples of other MNDs include primary lateral sclerosis (PLS), progressive muscular atrophy (PMA), and progressive bulbar palsy (PBP). In terms of levels ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2007
Experience With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Incidence, Pathology, and Treatment Considerations
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert M. Miller
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
  • Deanna Britton
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2007
Experience With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: Incidence, Pathology, and Treatment Considerations
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, October 2007, Vol. 12, 17-22. doi:10.1044/gero12.1.17
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, October 2007, Vol. 12, 17-22. doi:10.1044/gero12.1.17
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive, degenerative neurological disease affecting motor neurons throughout the nervous system and, therefore, referred to as a motor neuron disease (MND). Examples of other MNDs include primary lateral sclerosis (PLS), progressive muscular atrophy (PMA), and progressive bulbar palsy (PBP). In terms of levels of neuropathology, prognosis, and management, there are some important distinguishing features.
ALS, often referred to as Lou Gehrig’s disease, is a degeneration of both upper motor neurons (UMNs), corticobulbar and/or corticospinal tracts, and lower motor neurons (LMNs), neurons originating in the brainstem and spinal cord. By definition, then, a patient diagnosed with ALS must show symptoms that reflect pathology at both levels. UMN symptoms include weakness, spasticity, and hyperactive reflexes. LMN symptoms may include flaccid paralysis and atrophy, often with visible fasciculations.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.