Lewy Body Dementia Helen, age 79, was taken by her daughter to see a neurologist. The daughter was concerned that Helen was showing signs of early Alzheimer’s disease. She was described as being “fine” on some days, while on other days she appeared “confused and jumpy.” Further investigation by the neurologist revealed ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2005
Lewy Body Dementia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan Goldfein
    Older Adult Consultation Service, Westport, CT
  • Constance Dean Qualls
    State University of New York College at Buffalo
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2005
Lewy Body Dementia
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, December 2005, Vol. 10, 7-10. doi:10.1044/gero10.2.7
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, December 2005, Vol. 10, 7-10. doi:10.1044/gero10.2.7
Helen, age 79, was taken by her daughter to see a neurologist. The daughter was concerned that Helen was showing signs of early Alzheimer’s disease. She was described as being “fine” on some days, while on other days she appeared “confused and jumpy.” Further investigation by the neurologist revealed that Helen had fluctuating loss of memory, language, and reasoning skills. The fluctuation was pronounced; she had episodes of total confusion, separated by intervals of lucidity and clear thinking. She had long conversations with imagined images. Sometimes she accused her daughter of stealing her belongings. She often fell. Other medical conditions as a causative factor were ruled out. Specifically, history was negative for stroke, hypertension, or other vascular problems. Also, she had no physical illnesses or adverse drug reactions. Helen was diagnosed with probable Lewy body dementia.
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