Alzheimer's Disease: An Overview of Clinical Presentation, Treatment, and Research Concern for memory and worry over whether we will lose cognitive ability as we age plagues us all. These worries are amplified by the unspoken, but widespread, belief shared by the lay public and professionals that there is nothing to be done about such problems. The result is that ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2005
Alzheimer's Disease: An Overview of Clinical Presentation, Treatment, and Research
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary Sano
    Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY
  • Jed A. Levine
    Programs & Services, Alzheimer's Association, New York City Chapter, New York, NY
  • Mary Mittelman
    New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2005
Alzheimer's Disease: An Overview of Clinical Presentation, Treatment, and Research
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, December 2005, Vol. 10, 3-6. doi:10.1044/gero10.2.3
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, December 2005, Vol. 10, 3-6. doi:10.1044/gero10.2.3
Concern for memory and worry over whether we will lose cognitive ability as we age plagues us all. These worries are amplified by the unspoken, but widespread, belief shared by the lay public and professionals that there is nothing to be done about such problems. The result is that many elders with genuine concerns about their memory and cognition never seek evaluation, and there is significant underdiagnosis of memory loss and dementia. It is possible that the subtle, but measurable, bias against use of medical resources among the elderly exacerbates this problem. In fact, these beliefs and biases are unfounded and an accurate diagnosis is the first step towards (a) providing effective and efficient delivery of medical and supportive services; (b) maintaining the highest possible quality of life for patients and for the relatives and friends who take care of them and who are crucial to their well-being; and (c) focusing efforts on meaningful research to prevent, treat, and manage the disease. Here are some important issues.
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