Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Clinical Perspective The biggest challenge of this exciting era of brain science is to translate new discoveries from research into clinical practice. Often there is a substantial time lag in converting new information gleaned from research into diagnostic and treatment protocols. The gap between research and practice can be partly addressed ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2005
Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Clinical Perspective
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Raksha Anand
    Center for Brain Health, University of Texas at Dallas
  • Sandra Bond Chapman
    Center for Brain Health, University of Texas at Dallas
  • Jennifer Zientz
    Center for Brain Health, University of Texas at Dallas
  • Katy Toussaint
    Center for Brain Health, University of Texas at Dallas
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   December 01, 2005
Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Clinical Perspective
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, December 2005, Vol. 10, 10-14. doi:10.1044/gero10.2.10
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, December 2005, Vol. 10, 10-14. doi:10.1044/gero10.2.10
The biggest challenge of this exciting era of brain science is to translate new discoveries from research into clinical practice. Often there is a substantial time lag in converting new information gleaned from research into diagnostic and treatment protocols. The gap between research and practice can be partly addressed by passing on clinically relevant information acquired from research directly to clinicians who deliver services to patient populations. With this view in mind, we present information on a relatively new clinical construct known as “mild cognitive impairment” for the benefit of speech-language pathologists who work with older adults.
Cognitive impairment in seniors that fails to meet the formal diagnostic criteria for dementia has drawn a great deal of research attention in recent years. Several terms such as “age-associated memory impairment,” “age-associated cognitive impairment,” “cognitive impairment no dementia,” and “mild cognitive impairment” have been used to describe such changes in cognition. Of these terms, “mild cognitive impairment” (MCI) is the most popular of all, and MCI has been the subject of widespread research.
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