Neurobiology of Normal Aging, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and Alzheimer's Disease: A Tutorial “Celebrating Long-Term Living” was the theme of this year’s Older Americans Month (May), sponsored by the Administration on Aging (AoA). And do we have reason to celebrate! More older Americans than ever are healthier, living longer, living in their own homes, and highly active in their communities (AoA, 2005). ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2005
Neurobiology of Normal Aging, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and Alzheimer's Disease: A Tutorial
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Constance Dean Qualls
    Buffalo State University Buffalo, NY
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   August 01, 2005
Neurobiology of Normal Aging, Mild Cognitive Impairment, and Alzheimer's Disease: A Tutorial
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, August 2005, Vol. 10, 2-7. doi:10.1044/gero10.1.2
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, August 2005, Vol. 10, 2-7. doi:10.1044/gero10.1.2
“Celebrating Long-Term Living” was the theme of this year’s Older Americans Month (May), sponsored by the Administration on Aging (AoA). And do we have reason to celebrate! More older Americans than ever are healthier, living longer, living in their own homes, and highly active in their communities (AoA, 2005). In 2003, adults age 65 and older made up about 12 percent of the U.S. population, according to the Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics (FIFARS, 2004) . This number is expected to rise sharply in the coming decades. In 2011, the Baby Boomers (individuals born between 1946 and 1964) will begin turning 65, and, by 2030, the older population is expected to be twice as large as their counterparts in 2000 (increasing from 35 million to about 72 million [FIFARS]). The oldest-old (individuals age 85 years and over) are the fastest growing older adult population, and the FIFARS projects that declining death rates for this group will result in even faster growth. This brief synopsis of what we will soon be facing gives rise to two fundamental questions for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and researchers:
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