Benefits of a Timed Snack Protocol for Geriatric Patients With Dementia and Dysphagia The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of snack recommendations in promoting weight gain among residents diagnosed with dysphagia and dementia (mild/moderate). A two-part comparison study was performed with residents for whom snack recommendations were made at the time of their dysphagia evaluations: The first part of ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2005
Benefits of a Timed Snack Protocol for Geriatric Patients With Dementia and Dysphagia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Faerella Boczko
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Jewish Home and Hospital Life Care System, Bronx, NY
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Articles
Article   |   August 01, 2005
Benefits of a Timed Snack Protocol for Geriatric Patients With Dementia and Dysphagia
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, August 2005, Vol. 10, 17-18. doi:10.1044/gero10.1.17
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, August 2005, Vol. 10, 17-18. doi:10.1044/gero10.1.17

The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of snack recommendations in promoting weight gain among residents diagnosed with dysphagia and dementia (mild/moderate). A two-part comparison study was performed with residents for whom snack recommendations were made at the time of their dysphagia evaluations: The first part of this pilot study utilized a time-specific medication protocol enforced by interdisciplinary team members, while the second portion of the study intentionally followed no specific model beyond initial recommendation by the speech-language pathologist (SLP). All subjects were residents at a long-term care facility. Initial dysphagia evaluations were conducted because of weight loss. The pilot data support the following conclusions: An interdisciplinary team must ensure complete follow-through of recommendations. In approaching the concept of snacks as “medication,” intake can be prescribed by medical personnel to ensure delivery as well as to encourage the resident who refuses meals. Hand-held snacks of the resident's preference remain a condition of the “medication.” Medical and nursing staff must be educated regarding nutritional benefits. While self-feeding as an aspect of ADL independence represents an ideal scenario, creative methods must be explored to encourage food intake. A need exists for future research to determine appropriate intervention measures that will provide assessment of measurable outcomes regarding improvement in self-feeding ability.

Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.