Collaborating With Activities Professionals in Nursing Homes Speech-language pathologists can find a wealth of untapped professional help in nursing homes today. One helpful resource can be derived from collaborating with the Activity Department. The activities professional is charged with creating and providing varied and interesting activities for all residents and ensuring that each resident participates regularly. ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2005
Collaborating With Activities Professionals in Nursing Homes
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Melissa Hall
    Rehab Systems, LLC, Dexter, MO
  • Catherine H. Nye
    Rehab Systems, LLC, Dexter, MO
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Healthcare Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   August 01, 2005
Collaborating With Activities Professionals in Nursing Homes
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, August 2005, Vol. 10, 15-17. doi:10.1044/gero10.1.15
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, August 2005, Vol. 10, 15-17. doi:10.1044/gero10.1.15
Speech-language pathologists can find a wealth of untapped professional help in nursing homes today. One helpful resource can be derived from collaborating with the Activity Department. The activities professional is charged with creating and providing varied and interesting activities for all residents and ensuring that each resident participates regularly. Documentation of a resident’s participation in these activities becomes part of each resident’s medical record and is closely monitored by state surveyors. Participation in activities is a mandated part of the resident’s rights (Medicare, 2004).
Residents with communication disorders present special challenges to activities professionals, who typically have no special training in communication disorders. They are often very receptive to information and ideas from the speech-language pathologist, because residents with communication or cognitive disorders participate minimally, if at all, in activities. Cooperative activities have been shown to improve language abilities in aphasics (Johnson & Johnson, 1994). However, if the resident is unable to participate, she or he is unable to learn.
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