Article  |   December 2009
Assessment and Treatment Approaches for the Patient With COPD
Author Affiliations
  • Jocelyn E. Alexander
    Therapy Partners of Ohio, Middleburg Heights, OH
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody
Article   |   December 2009
Assessment and Treatment Approaches for the Patient With COPD
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, December 2009, Vol. 14, 33-36. doi:10.1044/gero14.2.33
SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology, December 2009, Vol. 14, 33-36. doi:10.1044/gero14.2.33
Abstract:

Abstract  As more adults reach their later years, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) becomes a highly complicating factor with regards to overall health. For the purpose of this article, “COPD” is used as an umbrella term that includes emphysema, bronchitis, and, at times, asthma. It is progressive in nature. The main symptoms of COPD are usually readily apparent to the skilled observer: shortness of breath, decreased capacity for physical activity, presence of a chronic obstructive cough, loss of appetite with possible weight loss, and increased fatigue (Connell & Richman, 2009). Not surprisingly, this short list of symptoms alone can create havoc for the speech-language pathologist, because COPD can cause a multitude of problems, including voice, communication, and swallowing disorders.

Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 15 Perspectives on Gerontology content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access